Art and design inspiration from around the world – CreativeRoots

Explore South Korea

Inspired by - South Korea

South Korean rice wine packaging – Ahwang-ju

Posted by rod - 02.03.2015

South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju

 

“Uigwe” from Joseon Dynasty

 

South Korean design studio ContentFormContext created the Ahwang-ju rice wine packaging.

“Ahwang-ju is Korean traditional clear rice wine based on the original recipe from the Korea, 1000 years ago, restored by Haeng-sook Choi, the master of Miin brewery Korea. Tradition says that people in the royal court used to make Ahwang-ju quite often during the Joseon Dynasty. We researched “Uigue”, a collection of Royal Protocols of the over 500 year-long Joseon Dynasty, that both records and prescribes the major ceremonies and rites of the royal family. “Uigwe” inspired us to create labels illustrating the royal court ceremony.”

South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju1

Illustrations inspired by “Uigwe”.

South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju2

For the brand identity, we reconstructed Chinese & Korean characters.

South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-juSouth Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-juSouth Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju5South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju6South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-juSouth Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju8South Korean rice wine packaging - Ahwang-ju

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Miin – Korean traditional rice wine

Posted by rod - 27.01.2015

Miin - Korean traditional rice wine1

Miin is a Korean traditional rice wine brewed at Paju. The label design was inspired by old maps from the Joseon Dynasty that incorporated Chinese characters. “Miin” means beautiful woman in Korean therefore the Seoul design agency ContentFromContext created sophisticated curved lines to make it more feminin.

Miin - Korean traditional rice wine2Miin - Korean traditional rice wineMiin - Korean traditional rice wine3  Miin - Korean traditional rice wine1Miin - Korean traditional rice wine1Miin - Korean traditional rice wine10Miin - Korean traditional rice wine8Miin - Korean traditional rice wine1Miin - Korean traditional rice wine1Miin - Korean traditional rice wine6Miin - Korean traditional rice wine1

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Inspired by - South Korea

Korean warrior illustration by Jon Contino for Nike We Run

Posted by rod - 12.11.2013

Korean warrior illustration by Jon Contino for Nike We Run

New York native Jon Contino together with art director Michael Malowanczyk created the awesome Nike We Run 2013 identity which is running for its fifth year. The branding, illustrations and hand drawn font will cover 25 cities around the world.

As you can see I especially like the Seoul event branding, because of the Korean warrior illustration in the background. Yi Sun-shin is his name and his legacy lives on as a statue in the centre of Seoul near the city hall.

You should definitely check out the entire brand identity.

Korean warrior illustration by Jon Contino for Nike We Run Korean warrior illustration by Jon Contino for Nike We Run Korean warrior illustration by Jon Contino for Nike We Run

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Inspired by - South Korea

Pyeong Chang 2018 winter olympics brand identity

Posted by rod - 28.06.2013

The 2018 winter Olympics will be hosted in PyongChang, South Korea, winning against Munich and Annecy. The olympics brand identity was inspired by the Hangul writing system, the phonetic Korean language.

Pyeong Chang 2018 winter olympics brand identity

“The logo design has its roots in Hangul, with the shapes that form the logo stemming from the first consonants of each syllable in the word “PyeongChang” when it is written in Hangul. The first character in the emblem also represents a gathering place where the three elements of Cheon-ji-in – heaven, earth, and human – are in harmony. The second character symbolises snow and ice, as well as the athletes’ stellar performances.

Pyeong Chang 2018 winter olympics brand identity

Traditional Korean Colours: The emblem uses five traditional Korean colours – black, blue/green, yellow, red, and white – which is the same colour scheme as that found in the Olympic flag. Traditionally, blue and green were represented by a single word in Hangul but this has now changed, with separate words now existing for each. The five cardinal colours are found in many aspects of daily life and tradition in Korea, including in clothing, celebrations, martial arts, architecture, art and food.”

Read more about the identity in the press release

Via Brand New

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Inspired by - North Korea

Vintage Korean photographs

Posted by rod - 18.03.2013

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100 years ago life in Korea was different as it is today. The two Koreas, North and South were still one country, occupied by the Japanese. The above pictures document the daily lives of the Korean people back in the late 19th – early 20th centuries. via vintag

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Inspired by - North Korea

Korean typography poster

Posted by rod - 22.02.2013

Anatomy of the Korean writing system Hangul by Joonghyum choAnatomy of the Korean writing system Hangul by Joonghyum choAnatomy of the Korean writing system Hangul by Joonghyum choAnatomy of the Korean writing system Hangul by Joonghyum choAnatomy of the Korean writing system Hangul by Joonghyum choAnatomy of the Korean writing system Hangul by Joonghyum cho

Seoul designer Joonghyun Cho created this Korean typography poster explain Korean character (Hangule) for foreigner who study design in South Korea.

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Inspired by - South Korea

The True Origins of Pizza

Posted by rod - 23.03.2012

So you thought that the pizza comes from Italy? Think again, at least for a few seconds. The True Origins of Pizza is a hoax campaign promoting Mr Pizza in South Korea. Disguised as a documentary, the campaign starts with a protester outside a New York pizza place and moves on to a bunch of experts in South Korea. They come up with all sorts of evidence which suggest that the pizza originates from South Korea and that Marco Polo stole the concept. Created by produced by fictional company Gumshoe Pictures. Via theinspirationroomtrue origins of pizza south korea




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Inspired by - South Korea

Traditional Korea pattern meets modern sports gear

Posted by rod - 03.10.2011

 

Amulet Helmet traditional Korean patternAmulet Helmet traditional Korean patternAmulet Helmet traditional Korean pattern

South Korean designer Kim Jungwoo and three students from the Seoul National University of Technology designed the ‘Amulet Helmet. The design for the bicycle helmet was inspired from a traditional Korean pattern ‘Su Ja Mun’ meaning longevity. The Amulet Helmet won the 2009 grand prize for the traditional pattern utilization competition.

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Inspired by - South Korea

Korean Hangeul Posters

Posted by rod - 20.06.2011

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Another great type project by Ki-chul Song who seams to have a real passion for the Korean writing system Hangeul. In a previous post Ki-chul created the animated Hangeul type project which is worth a look at. This time he created a series of typographic posters with the writing system.

Hangeul has a total of 28 letters, which consisted of 11 vowels and 17 consonants. Each letter indicates an individual sound or phoneme. The first printed Hangeul type was in 1447.

What do you think about these posters?

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Inspired by - North Korea

Korean Hangeul typography project

Posted by rod - 19.05.2011

Korea hanguel typography project Korea hanguel typography project Korea hanguel typography project Korea hanguel typography project

 

Korean designer Ki-chul Song created this amazing Hangeul Typography project.

“Have you heard about the Hangeul writing system that Koreans use? Koreans have used Hangeul since its invention in 1443 by King Sejong. Hangeul is quite different from the written character sets of neighboring countries such as China and Japan. Hangeul consists of 14 consonants and 10 vowels; these 24 characters can cover almost every spoken sound. In particular, the consonants of Hangeul are easy to learn because the characters were patterned after human speech organs and the stroke-adding principle, which adds strokes to basic characters to create new characters. Thanks to these features, Hangeul is recognized as one of the most scientific and logical character sets of the information era. I can feel this feature when I send text messages in Hangeul through cell phones, one of the representative information devices of our time.”

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Inspired by - South Korea

Kia Naimo

Posted by rod - 04.04.2011

kia naimo electic car traditionalkia naimo electic car traditionalkia naimo electic car traditionalkia naimo electic car traditional

The Kia Naimo electric concept car takes its name from the Korean word “Ne-mo”, that means ‘square shape’. Kia’s design chief Peter Schreyer didn’t want to make a car that looked Korean. But the more time he spent in Korea the more he got influenced, which eventually lead the team to design a car that had some clues in it coming from Korean crafts and art.

The Naimo combines the tradition of ancient Korea with the technology of modern Korea.

Its pale green jade color is derived from that used in Korean Celadon-style pottery. The headliner is made from hand-crafted hanji paper. Korean oak is used to trim the doors and cover the floor, as it is in traditional Korean architecture

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Inspired by - North Korea

Mandu Korean Dumplings

Posted by rod - 25.02.2011

These Mandu (Korean Dumplings) look interesting. Created with kimchi, tofu, sesame salt and pork mince fillings. via tasteologie

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Inspired by - South Korea

First printed hangul type

Posted by rod - 24.10.2010

The first printed Hangul type (1447!) can be seen in the printing museum in South Korea. via welovetypography

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Inspired by - South Korea

Jaewon Seok – Korean typography

Posted by rod - 23.09.2010

Jaewon Seok is a South Korean graphic designer who works across a howl range of mediums. I Selected out some of his typography designs which feature the mid 15th century developed Hangul writing script. More on Hangul here. via graphichug

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Inspired by - South Korea

The Korea, Be Inspired Campaign

Posted by rod - 14.07.2010

The Korea “Be Inspired” Campaign was developed by Cheil Worldwide and it’s objectives where:

“The campaign is aimed at increasing international awareness of Korea as a tourism destination. It focuses on the Korean culture and landscapes for the US & European markets; hospitality and nature for the Japanese market (with Korean actor Bae Yong Joon); music, fashion and energy for the Asian market.” via brandingkorea

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Inspired by - South Korea

korean pavilion at shanghai world expo 2010

Posted by rod - 25.05.2010

Designed by Architectual firm Mass studies, the South Korean pavilion is absolutely a type lovers dream.

“Concept
With land culture (China) and sea culture (Japan) surrounding the peninsula, Korea has been permeable to imported cultures and global influences, whose progressive mix defines contemporary Korean society. Using ‘convergence’ as the main theme, the Korea Pavilion is an amalgamation of ‘sign’ (symbol) and ‘space': Signs become spaces, and simultaneously, spaces become signs.

Sign as Space
Han-geul, the Korean alphabet, is the prime element of ‘signs’ within the pavilion. The overall volume, lifted 7.2m above ground level, is created by converging these Han-geul letters, allowing signs to create the exhibition space, and so that the visitors can experience their geometry through horizontal, vertical and diagonal movements. The primary geometries that compose the Han-geul letters are universal to other cultures, thus acting as a sort of ‘open’ set of signs that is engaging to everyone.
The exterior surfaces of the Korea Pavilion are clad in 2 types of pixels: Han-geul Pixels and Art Pixels. Han-geul Pixels are white panels with a relief of letters in four different sizes whose combination forms the majority of the exterior, mainly the peripheral surfaces. Most of the non-peripheral surfaces are composed of Art Pixels, which are 45cm x 45cm aluminum panels created by a Korean artist, Ik-Joong Kang, who is renowned for creating massive art walls out of small hand-painted tiles, either self-produced or by gathering from around the world (thus being another type of convergence). About 40,000 of these panels will texture the façade, contributing a bright palette of colors, hope, and unity throughout the Korea Pavilion. The art pixels, individually autographed by the artist, will be sold at the end of the Expo. All sales proceeds will be donated to an international charity organization. Not only will it raise funds for a cause, but through this social and artistic process, the recycling of façade material units, as works of art, will also enhance the sustainability of the Korea pavilion in a unique way, by directly and critically addressing the sustainability of this temporary structure that is only 6-months in use. The surfaces will project different atmospheres during the day and night, with light and shadows creating different textures. Sequential lighting is installed behind the Hangeul Pixels to highlight the individual letters on the exterior façade at night, further animating the pavilion as a sign (like a text message) on a larger scale.” Images © designboom

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Inspired by - South Korea

South Korean Stamps

Posted by rod - 10.04.2010

A collection of South Korean stamps. via danstopicals, iomoon, english.chosun

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Ahn Sang-Soo

Posted by rod - 17.03.2010

Here is some selected work of Ahn Sang Soo who is one of the most influential designers in Korea, renowned for developing the traditional Hangul typography into a functional medium for today. via egodesign.ca and typolover.com

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