Art and design inspiration from around the world – CreativeRoots

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Inspired by - Japan

Japanese paper city

Posted by rod - 01.06.2012

Japanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko MatsuiJapanese paper city by Yumiko Matsui

How cool are these Japanese paper cities?

New York-based artist Yumiko Matsui recreated parts of Tokyo and Osaka which he skillfully crafted out of paper. The miniature world, imitates traditional streets, shopping centers, food stands and signs, capturing the cities character.

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Japanese symbols

Posted by rod - 11.05.2012

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dinaSymbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Teapot

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Fan

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Kimono

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Origami crane

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Sake

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Noble woman

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Taiko drum

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Geta sandal

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Torii

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Koi

Symbols of Japan for Japan day by christopher dina

Lacquered bowl

 

Japan has a strong history and visual culture which is widely spread around the world. Icons such as the Koi fish, Kimono or the noble woman are instantly recognisable as being Japanese.

New York designer Christopher Dina designed these lovely Japanese symbols for the “Japan Day” at the Central park 2012. The icons above represent Japanese arts and crafts, fashion, pop culture, music and more.

I love the simplicity of these Japanese symbols, I also like the main image where all symbols are places into central park surrounded by trees and the city buildings.

If I would live in New York I would definitely check out the event and get stuck into all the activities. via designboom

 

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Umino Seaweed Design Nori

Posted by rod - 09.04.2012

Umino Seaweed design nori japanUmino Seaweed design nori japanUmino Seaweed design nori japanUmino Seaweed design nori japanUmino Seaweed design nori japanUmino Seaweed design nori japanUmino Seaweed design nori japan

These japanese seaweed designs take the sushi experience to the next level.  I&S BBDO, Tokyo won the Best of Show Design Lotos at Adfest in Thailand for their Umino Seaweed designs. The designs merge traditional Japanese pattern design with the latest cutting technology. The five designs: Sakura (Cherry Blossoms), Mizutama (Water Drops), Asanoha (Hemp), Kikkou (Turtle Seashell), Kumikkou (Tortoise Shell) were developed to help the North East Japan company to rebuild itself after the 2011 tsunami. via theinspirationroom

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Japanese restaurant design – Micchan

Posted by rod - 04.04.2012

Japanese restaurant design - Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design - Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima JapanJapanese restaurant design and illustration for  Micchan in Hiroshima Japan

The Japanese restaurant Micchan has a lovely illustrative identity. The complete restaurant identity is built up by several well executed illustrations depicting the japanese city Hiroshima. IC4Design created the illustrations and designs for Micchan including poster, packaging and restaurant design.

Other japanese restaurant identities which I admire and are worth taking a look at are:

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Hiroshima illustrations – Shinkin bank

Posted by rod - 20.03.2012

Hiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bankHiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bankHiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bankHiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bank

Jan. & Feb.    New Year’s holiday  /  Miyajima shrine with the red gate

Hiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bank

Mar. & Apr.   Cherry Blossom Viewing  /  Hiroshima Big Arch Stadium

Hiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bank

May. & Jun.   Flying carp  /  Peace Memorial Park and the Atomic Bomb Dome

Hiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bank

Jul. & Aug.   Summer festival  /  Hiroshima Castle

Hiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bank

Sep. & Oct.  Autumn leaves  /  Hiroshima Station and MAZDA Stadium

Hiroshima illustrations - Shinkin bank

Nov. & Dec.  Winter Holidays  /  Hiroshima Museum of Contemporary Art

 

IC4design created six illustrations of the Japanese city of Hiroshima for the Shinkin bank. The illustrations feature iconic places and buildings of Hiroshima such as the Miyajima shrine, Hiroshima Big Arch Stadium and Hiroshima Castle.

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Japanese people illustrations

Posted by rod - 12.03.2012

Japanese people illustrations geisha by hey studioJapanese people illustrations geisha by hey studioJapanese people illustrations clothing by Hey studioJapanese people illustrations clothing by hey studioJapanese people illustrations samurai by hey studioJapanese people illustrations ninja by hey studio

Japanese people are known for their extraordinary clothing culture which captivates the rest of the world. Some of Japans most well known characters are the Geisha, Samurai warrior and the Ninja, each having their own traditional clothing style. Barcelona design studio Hey illustrated 12 Japanese people and their traditional clothing.

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Japanese food packaging by Akaoni

Posted by rod - 16.02.2012

Japanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by AkaoniJapanese food packaging by Akaoni

I love japanese packaging design, from traditional japanese packaging, sake barrel packaging to the famous Kikkoman soya sauce. Tokyo design agency Akaoni created some beautiful designs. I especially like the packaging designs with the simple prints on the brown paper. via iainclaridge

What do you think about the designs?

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Japanese Yebisu beer packaging design

Posted by rod - 14.02.2012

Japanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging designJapanese Yebisu Beer packaging design original label

Yebisu beer is on of Japan’s oldest beer brands, first brewed in Tokyo in 1890. Yebisu represents the Japanese god of Happiness, luck and fisherman.

Created by design student Jin Fujiwara at the Academy of Art. Jin wanted to redesign Yebisu because it wasn’t a popular japanese beer brand such as its competitors Asahi and Kirin.

The main characteristic of the beer label is the smiling Yebisu who hopefully will stick in people minds. The secondary design elements such as the fishing rod and fish have become less prominent, which I feel are important elements to tell the brand story of Yebisu brand.

What do you think about the Yebisu beer packaging?

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Tales of Consumption illustrations

Posted by rod - 08.12.2011

 

Kani (King Crab Has a Delicious Brain)
The greenish paste, which is the brain of Red King Crab (タラバガニ) is considered a delicacy in Japan. It is called Kani Miso.

Japanese Tales of Consumption illustrations

Natto (Selfportrait from Another Lifetime)
Nattō –  saliva-like and smelly fermented soybeans  – is the food only the bravest Gaijin can take.

Japanese Tales of Consumption illustrations

Tales of Consumption by Zuza Misko from Warszawa is an ongoing series of artworks, loosely connected by the theme of the relationship between people and the food. II Series takes inspiration from the food loving Japanese nation.

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Hokusai Manga book – Japan

Posted by rod - 05.12.2011

Hokusai Manga - Japanese master artist's sketchbooksHokusai Manga - Japanese master artist's sketchbooksHokusai Manga - Japanese master artist's sketchbooksHokusai Manga - Japanese master artist's sketchbooks

If you love Japanese Art Hokusai Manga book is a must to get. The book is a massive compilation of the Japanese master artist’s sketchbooks, which are now available in a single book. 3,900 drawings, woodblock prints, and paintings fill the 970-page book. Check out the rest of the book here. via

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One of Japan’s last remaining swordsmiths

Posted by rod - 18.11.2011

One of Japan's last remaining swordsmithsOne of Japan's last remaining swordsmithsOne of Japan's last remaining swordsmiths

Korehira Watanabe is one of 30 remaining Japanese swordsmiths. He has devoted 40 years of his life to attempt to recreate Koto. Koto is a type of sword that dates back to the Heian and Kamakura periods ((794-1333 AD). There are no documents that could help Watanabe’s quest, but he believes that he has come close enough of creating a replica of this mythical samurai sword. This film was created  by NY- based filmmaker Takeshi Fukunaga.

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Oni soap set

Posted by rod - 16.11.2011

oni soap sets Tradional Japanese monsters and ghosts inspired packaging designoni soap sets Tradional Japanese monsters and ghosts inspired packaging designoni soap sets Tradional Japanese monsters and ghosts inspired packaging design

Los Angeles based graphic designer and art director Ching Yu Wong designed the Oni soap sets for Onsen The packaging design was inspired by traditional Japanese monsters and ghosts.

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Japanese Daruma Print

Posted by rod - 27.10.2011

Japanese daruma print designJapanese daruma print designJapanese daruma print designJapanese daruma print design

This Japanese daruma print was designed by simpletype.

“In response to the devastating natural events in Japan, I have designed a limited edition print to sell in an attempt to raise money to donate to the Red Cross. Here is more information about the image: Daruma’s are round, hollow Japanese wish dolls in the shape of an egg. They are a symbolic representation of Bodhidharma, a Buddhist monk and founder of the art of Zen. According to legend, Bodhidharma lost his limbs while attaining this pure Zen state, therefore the doll is lacking limbs as well. The dolls are most commonly red but can also be found in yellow, black and white amongst other colors. Their painted faces feature a mustache and beard, skillfully brushed to resemble Bodhidharma. Using black ink or paint, one fills in a single circular eye while thinking of a wish, and should the wish become realized, the second eye can be happily filled in. Because of their low center of gravity, the Daruma doll returns to its upright position after being tilted on its side. As such, the doll has become a symbol for optimism, persistence and strong determination.”

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Sushi Ladies

Posted by rod - 21.10.2011

Sushi Ladies illustration

What do you get when you combine a Japanese Kimono and Sushi? A Sushi girl.

I absolutely love this illustration because it merges two distinct Japanese icons together. If you search on Google for different kimono styles you will for certain see some kimonos that feature distinct backs (look like a pillow) in Japanese they are called tare (I think). Malaysian designer Chow Hon Lam aka flyingmouse365 replaces these tares with different nigiris creating a perfect image. FM365 is also the man behind the lovely National animal t-shirt design which is worth checking out.

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Torotoro – Sushi & Sake bar

Posted by rod - 10.10.2011

Torotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake barTorotoro sushi & Sake bar Neones

Torotoro is a Japanese restaurant designed by Mexican design agency Savvy. Whilst analyzing the Japanese restaurant market in the area, Savvy realized that the vast majority of restaurants brand themselves  through oriental clichés, often mixing Asian cultures without realizing it.

The visual language for Torotoro plays on the theme “A night in Tokyo”, with its light dynamics, cuisine and culture. The neon Japanese characters are inspired by Tokyo’s business district Ginza which is full of neon signs. Applying this strong and authentic visual language to Torotoro will hopefully enable it to stand out from its competitors and make it a real Japanese experience. Another Japanese restaurant that played with neon lights in its restaurant was Tokyo Bar in New York, which is worth checking out.

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Namazu-e Earthquake catfish Japan

Posted by rod - 01.09.2011

Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan Namazu-e Earthquake catfish prints Japan

The 1855 Great Ansei earthquake which struck the city of Edo (now Tokyo) was one of the major disasters, claiming 7,000 lives. In less than  a few days a new colour woodblock print named namazu-e became famous throughout the city. The prints depicted the mythical giant catfish who, according to legends caused the earthquakes.  Legends also say that the god Kashima keeps the Namazu under control, using a large rock. The 1855 earthquake happened because Kashima left the city, leaving Ebisu (God of fishing and commerce) in charge. via pinktentacle

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Taku Satoh | Two Experiments Exhibition

Posted by rod - 25.08.2011

Experimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku SatohExperimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku SatohExperimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku SatohExperimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku SatohExperimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku SatohExperimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku SatohExperimental japanese typography, hiragana by Taku Satoh

How cool are these 3-dimensional japanese letters? All of them are are made out of paper, stacked layer by layer on top of each other to form the letter. Each of Japanese letters (hiragana) are placed in a wooden box and elevated for the “Two Experiments Exhibition”. Japanese designer Taku Satoh created these. If you are interested in Hiragana you should check out the Hiragana in 3D. via spoon-tamago

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Origami inspired tea packaging

Posted by rod - 23.08.2011

Japanese inspired origami packaging design

Japanese inspired origami packaging design Japanese inspired origami packaging design Japanese inspired origami packaging design

I absolutely adore these origami packaging designs but there is something odd about the content: It is Chinese tea. Because of Japan and its well-known origami tradition it seems somewhat natural to associate these designs to Japan. For that reason I think that a false message is being conveyed by using origami figures to sell Chinese tea. Inspecting the packaging closer it looks like they are meant to be for the English speaking market, meaning that most people could think the same way as me.

According to Wikipedia, Zhezhi, or Chinese Paper Folding, is the predecessor of origami. So if this product would be launched in China, I can imagine that the public wouldn’t think of their Japanese neighbours at all.

Branward are the ones who created these beautiful packaging designs for the product called “Long Tea”, manufactured by Next Food. Long Tea’s strategy is ‘based on the creation of a good story, which could be told and retold as many times as necessary’.

What do you think about this peculiar mixture of Japanese origami design and traditional Chinese Tea?

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