Art and design inspiration from around the world – CreativeRoots

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The 10 most popular cities in India illustrated

Posted by rod - 23.03.2015

 

“Illustrations of the10 popular cities in India created for the Times Group for their upcoming web/ print experience. Each monument has a very high historic and cultural importance in the cities they are located and have been icons for the city. The visual language was to capture the essence of the monument in the most minimal, simplified way using only geometric shapes.”

The App is currently under production.

Created by Bangalore designer Ranganath Krishnamani.

The 10 most popular cities in India illustrated The 10 most popular cities in India illustrated

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Henna inspired packaging labels

Posted by rod - 18.11.2014

Henna inspired packaging label

Vancouver design studio Brandever together with illustrator Nina Hunter created these traditional henna inspired packaging labels for Umi’s indian kitchen. Umi’s kitchen specialises in making authentic Indian sauces and Chatnis from their Vancouver base.

Henna inspired packaging label1 Henna inspired packaging labelHenna inspired packaging label3Henna inspired packaging label4

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Taj Vivanta illustration set

Posted by rod - 29.09.2014

Mumbai based illustrator Lokesh karekar had the honour to create a set of eight illustrations for the Taj Vivanta – Luxury hotels.

These works were orchestrated to cover all the activities in and around various Taj Vivanta Properties in one strong symbolic element. Each illustration represents a particular property and depicts indian culture in a simple and contemporary way.

Each illustration piece is created in a unique style which reflects the essence of the location of the hotel. For example, the Jodhpur ‘Vintage Car – illustration’ was influenced by mirror work from Rajasthan. ‘Diya’ visual was influenced from the installation of 1000 lights in the Kumarakom hotel.

‘Banana Leaf’ of Coimbtore was influenced by the south indian Rangoli style.

The task was to visualize each activity in a minimalistic, simplistic manner and creating a balanced composition of elements. The detailing of the elements makes the series engaging and interesting to look at.

If you like Lokesh work check out this excellent ChaiTime tea label illustrations.

 

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Duke of Delhi packaging design

Posted by rod - 26.09.2014

Duke of Delhi packaging design6

London based design agency Bright Green Brands created this lovely packaging design and visual identity for the Duke of Delhi, mixing the rich culture of India with a hint of Britishness. The illustrations where created by Vanessa Wright

Barney Bryant has the following to say about the process:

“While pondering on the new identity I wondered who the Duke of Delhi might be: Was he an Englishman in India, or an Indian in England? And how would he travel? I decided that a horse-drawn royal carriage would be suitable in Britain or, if in India, then by royal elephant. Seeing my sketches in front of me, it just suddenly seemed the most obvious thing to do – put the two together, mixing the eccentricities of both cultures in one simple logo.”

Having had success with the biscuit packaging, Bright Green Brands where asked to create a new product – Delhi Mix – a Bombay mix with a quirky British twist, packaged in ‘tif in-style tins.

Duke of Delhi packaging design4Duke of Delhi packaging designDuke of Delhi packaging design6 Duke of Delhi packaging design2Duke of Delhi packaging design6Duke of Delhi packaging design7 Duke of Delhi packaging design6

via thedieline

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Mother India – Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant

Posted by rod - 01.07.2014

Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant

Mother India is Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant, which opened its doors in 1993 by the Sharma family. The restaurant prides itself as still being a family run business and they regard themselves as cultural ambassadors. The new generation wanted to strengthen the restaurants position by improving various elements. One of the first things Oslo based design studio Brandlab, where I work at suggested was to emphasise the fact that Mother India is Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant. This gave the designers a great amount of direction.

Brandlab did a complete revamp of the restaurant branding from the logo to the interior design. The logo is built up by three elements the first is the new symbol which is inspired by indian wood block and jewellery ornamentation. The second is the new customised wordmark which is based on the font Priori Serif. The font has been chosen because it had some characteristics found in the Devanagari script. This takes us to the third element which is the little golden Indian script which means Restaurant in Hindi. In addition to the logo a few symbols have been developed which highlight the key fact of being the oldest but also incorporating an illustration of the Mother India.

India is a place that has a lot of visual appeal and can be perceived as chaotic. In between the sophisticated and royal Indian design elements Brandlab incorporated collages which give this sense of organised chaos. The collages are a mix of the Sharmas’ family photo album, old indian stamps and photographs.

Designer by Rodney Boot

Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant1 Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurantMother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant2Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant5      Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant4 Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant7Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant8Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant9Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant6Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant11Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant13Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurantMother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant15Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant16Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant14Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant Mother India - Norway’s oldest authentic Indian restaurant17

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Indian truck art on mobile restroom

Posted by rod - 06.05.2014

Indian truck art on mobile restroom

Kohler’s global Creative Director Tristan Butterfield decided to provide a cultural makeover to this solar-powered mobile restroom container which won the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “Reinventing the Toilet Challenge” in 2012. After weeks of extensive research the result of the final exterior design established a cultural context to the environment in which these containers were placed. Selective motifs such as brightly coloured flowers, birds, animals and scenery together with messages propagated the significance of water conservation and environment sustainability. The exterior design of the restroom container was inspired by Indian truck art which is very recognisable thorough the country and was chosen for its cultural significance. Kohler hired local artists in India to paint the final design concept onto the container walls.

via designboom

Indian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroom  Indian truck art on mobile restroomIndian truck art on mobile restroom

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Indian Kannada script

Posted by rod - 28.01.2014

 

Kannada is an MA project by Divya Venkatesh attempting to provide typographic standards (relating specifically to letterform anatomy) for the Kannada script. It has been inspired by similar work done for the Devanagari script by Indian type experts: Mahindra Patel, S.V Bhagwat, and Bapurao Naik. As well as offering a means of identifying constituting letter parts, this book also offers a brief history into the evolution of the Kannada script, and how it functions structurally.Indian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada script Indian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada scriptIndian Kannada script

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The Golden Temple – India

Posted by rod - 26.11.2013

Hindu Pilgrims at The Golden Temple

US Photographer Julie Hall had the opportunity to travel to Indian and visit on of Indias most holy places.

“Most sacred shrine of the Sikh faith, Harmandir Sahib (The Abode of God or The Golden Temple), offers a singular experience of faith, community and culture in India. Sikhism professes the equality of all people and rejects discrimination on the basis of religion, race, caste or gender. The faith emerged during the 15th century in the Punjab region that today spans India and Pakistan. Its founder, Shri Guru Nanak Dev Ji, strongly rejected the Hindu caste system, polytheism and all forms of asceticism. He preached devotion to a single God, the brotherhood of man and commitment to community service. Ten gurus followed Guru Nanak and their collective teachings are enshrined in the Sikh holy book Sri Guru Granth Sahib, which is housed inside the Golden Temple (also known as Harimandir Sahib) and treated as a living guru. No photography is allowed inside the Golden Temple but it’s a fascinating scene where scriptures from the holy book are sung and music is played to an audience of people sitting on the floor. Peaceful, welcoming vibes abound. A distinct feature of all Sikh temples and the living embodiment of their faith is the langar, a volunteer-run kitchen that serves free vegetarian meals to all. The langar at the Golden Temple is the largest volunteer kitchen in the world, serving approximately 80,000 people a day and a million or more on holidays. It’s open 24-hours a day, everyone sits on the floor to eat, and anyone can pitch in and help, and they do. Its every Sikh’s duty. Surrounding the dining hall are huge areas where people peel and chop vegetables, make chapatis, cook lentils in huge cauldrons, and collect and wash dishes. Hindus, women, and people with physical disabilities regularly volunteer at the langar. Most of the images shown here were made during Bandi Chhorh Diwas, a Sikh holiday celebrated on the same day as Diwali, a significant Hindu holiday. Over a million people visit the temple at that time, including thousands of Hindu pilgrims on their return journey (by foot) from the Amarnath cave in the Himalayas, which takes place a few months earlier. People are allowed to sleep at the Golden Temple inside the dormitories and outside around the temple complex. The mood is both festive and devout, which I hope these images convey.”

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The Malayalee Alphabet

Posted by rod - 20.11.2013

Over the summer Indian illustrator Taarika John drew a whole bunch of characters in her notebook. After a while she decided to work on them further and created an A to Z of Malayalees. These posters illustrate a Malayalee for every alphabet.

All the characters are painted using water colours, using a fine liner pen to fill in the details. She then scanned them, and composed the posters on Photoshop.

For enquiries regarding buying prints, you can email Taarika

The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee Alphabet The Malayalee AlphabetThe Malayalee Alphabet

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Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India

Posted by rod - 06.11.2013

Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India

Ranganath Krishnamani created a series of travel postcards & posters of Karntaka India that represent the glory and spirit of India. Each artwork tells a story and captures the last impression of the indian heritage. It celebrates the countries art of culture in the true spirit, adding a modern classical twist to the way they have been designed.

This series of postcards, posters and coasters celebrates the heritage, culture and the popular destinations in Karntaka, India.

Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka IndiaTravel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka IndiaTravel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka IndiaTravel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka IndiaTravel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka IndiaTravel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka IndiaTravel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India Travel Postcards & Posters of Karntaka India

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Portraits of Sadhus in India

Posted by rod - 18.10.2013

Portaits of Sadhou in India

The Sadhu is usually referred to as Baba by common people, which also means father, grandfather, or uncle. Most of the Sadhu who have left behind all material attachments live in caves, forests and temples across India and Nepal. Photographer Alexis Pazoumian became aware of the spiritual people and decided to document them. via fubiz

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Portraits Of India’s Vanishing Jobs

Posted by rod - 24.09.2013

New York based Indian photographer Supranav Dash has an ongoing photographic project called Margianl Trades that features portraits of India’s vanishing jobs. As modern technology and other means crepes into India’s wider population many of the jobs that have been around for hundreds of years will be disappearing. Since 2011 Supranav has photographed various professions from around the India.

” Trades and professional practices have always been intertwined with the Caste System in India. Each caste and its sub-sets would stereotype an individual and dictate their occupational practice. Since the early 1800’s, people were not allowed to deviate from their fixed professions or they would be outlawed by society, with at the time, social morals reflected ignorance and strong attachment to orthodox beliefs. The tradition of professions and trades being passed down the line from father to son, continued for generations until recently when globalisation and rapid socio-economic change resulted in the problem of enculturation and automation. At that point, many of the age-old practices faded out, while others are currently on their way to extinction. The modern Indian generation refuses to stick to their ancestral professions and trades; they have become more daring and switch to the more lucrative business possibilities. the abandonment of the traditional practices also result from insufficient incomes, a desire to escape the caste stereotypes, the constant neglect of the privileged classes of the society these people serve, and a government that is not open to social reforms.

Global trends are constantly changing, therefore, in these increasingly frantic times: it’s very easy to gorget our past, culture and traditions. I am not opposed to modernisation, but at the same time, I want to slow things down and force one’s self to recognise and remember the beauty of these analog practices. As a photographer, I want to use my craft to pay respect to these tradesmen and bring them to light.”

via fastcodesign

Portraits Of India's Vanishing Jobs

SUGARCANE JUICE SELLER

Portraits Of India's Vanishing Jobs

STREET TYPIST

Portraits Of India's Vanishing Jobs

SAW-MILL OWNER AND HANDS

Portraits Of India's Vanishing Jobs

HAND-RICKSHAW PULLER

Portraits Of India's Vanishing Jobs

KNIFE GRINDER II,

Portraits Of India's Vanishing Jobs

OIL-TIN CANS RESELLER

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Domestic violence against Indian goddesses

Posted by rod - 13.09.2013

As we all heard from the news, domestic violence in India is on the rise, especially against women. This campaign by Mumbai ad agency Taproot hopefully will make some of the bad guys think twice. The agency physically recreated scenes from old hand-painted images of Indian goddesses. Make-up was used to add bruises and wounds to the models before photographing them.

This is not the first time Indian gods are used to prevent people from doing stuff they should. The campaign for disrupting urination norms in Mumbai was a great success agains people with a weak bladder. I hope the campaign by Taproot will be just as successful. via lookslikegooddesign

Domestic violence against Indian goddesses ad campaignDomestic violence against Indian goddesses ad campaignDomestic violence against Indian goddesses ad campaignDomestic violence against Indian goddesses ad campaignDomestic violence against Indian goddesses ad campaignDomestic violence against Indian goddesses ad campaign

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Indian perfume packaging design – Vaara

Posted by rod - 29.08.2013

Jodhpur is one of the most fascinating cities in India, with one of the largest forts in the country, the bustling city markets, the grand palace and it’s beautiful gardens, the city has lots to offer. English perfume retailer Penhaligon recently launched a new design for Vaara, its latest scent. The fragrance takes inspiration from the Royal House of Marwar in Jodphurand the Maharaja’s desire to create a scent to celebrate the arrival of his granddaughter, Vaara.

According to Daniela Nunzi – Mihranian, creative director of jkr global, London. ‘With such a rich story, we had so many sources of inspiration to draw upon. We were particularly taken by the bright colours of the city of Jodhpur and decided to make these an intrinsic element of the design. The vibrancy of Vaara immediately transports you to this exotic world of beauty, where colour, fragrance and flavours mix.’

Indian perfume packaging design - Vaara Indian perfume packaging design - Vaara

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The Ghoda Cycle Project India

Posted by rod - 24.06.2013

‘The Ghoda Cycle Project’ is a visual document of the myriad avatars of bicycles in the rural and urban landscape of India. The linchpin of ‘The Ghoda Cycle Project’ is to lay emphasis on the framework, structure, decoration and design of the cycles of India. Created by Sameer Kulavoor

The Ghoda Cycle Project India The Ghoda Cycle Project India

Ergonomically these cycles may not be the best examples of bicycle design, but they have the strength to carry the hopes and aspirations of a big section of the Indian population. No wonder they are called ghoda* cycles. Basic necessities like cooking gas, milk, bread, newspapers and tiffin are delivered to our homes on a cycle. And then there are the mobile cycle shops that sell, among other things, tea, vegetables, waist-belts, ice-creams and SIM- -cards! Its a display not only of sustainable living but also how a section of the society in India make a livelihood out of it. With customization, adornments, embellishments and a bit of jugaad** these cycles start developing their own unique personality, reflecting the occupation and background of the rider. And also collectively adds life and charm to the streets of India, where more than 20,000*** cycles are manufactured everyday. The following pages are a collection of my observations and drawings of these omnipresent cycles of India.

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*Sturdy, durable and heavy, iron double-bar and four-bar roadster bicycles affectionately compared to horses and nicknamed: Stallion- -cycle (Ghoda-Cycle) **Jugaad colloquially means a creative idea / a quick workaround to get through commercial, logistic or law issues. As such, the Jugaad movement has gathered a community of enthusiasts, believing it to be the proof of Indian bubbling creativity, or a cost-effective way to solve the issues of everyday life. (source-wikipedia) ***The Indian company – Hero cycles – were declared as the largest manufacturer of bicycles in the world by the ‘Guiness book of world records’ producing 18,500 bicycles per day.

 

 

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Kalaripayattu Fighters, India

Posted by rod - 28.05.2013

Kalaripayattu Fighters, India Kalaripayattu Fighters, India Kalaripayattu Fighters, India Kalaripayattu Fighters, India Kalaripayattu Fighters, India Kalaripayattu Fighters, India

 

Whilst visiting the southern Indian town of Munnar photographer Armand Poblete found out about the ancient art of Kalaripayattu at Punarjani Traditional Village. The Indian martial art is primarily practiced in the southern state of Kerala and is one of the olds fighting systems in existence. Being a huge fan of martial arts and with a bit of luck on his side Armand managed to get a vip seating right in front of the line to see the action.

“First I observed the light and the action of the fighters. The dimly lit arena just gave it that feel of an ’80s kung fu poster, and I wanted to keep it that way. After a few camera adjustments and a few hundred missed shots I finally captured the two fighters in midair.”

via national geographic

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Edible Branding “Roti Reminds to wash hands”

Posted by rod - 23.05.2013

Edible Branding Roti Reminds to wash hands, lifebuoy Edible Branding Roti Reminds to wash hands, lifebuoy Edible Branding Roti Reminds to wash hands, lifebuoy

If you have ever visited India, you may had to eat your food with your hands. For a lot of Indians this is the only way to eat, and is part of their culture. Unilever got in contact with Ogilvy, Mumbai to promote it’s Lifebuoy soap during the Worlds larges religious festival Kumbh Mela. Over a 100 million Hindu pilgrims attend the Kumbh Mela, providing a huge opportunity for Unilever. The idea Ogilvy came up with was to remind people about the importance about hygiene before tucking into their food by branding the message Lifebuoy se haath dhoye kya? “Have you washed your hands with Lifebouy today?” into a roti.

Check out the video for more information.

via randomspecific

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Decorative Devanagari font

Posted by rod - 17.05.2013

Decorative Devanagari font  Decorative Devanagari font Decorative Devanagari fontDecorative Devanagari fontDecorative Devanagari fontDecorative Devanagari fontDecorative Devanagari fontDecorative Devanagari font

For me the Indian Devanagari script looks very decorative. But for Indian designer Sneha Patel it wasn’t, thus he created a Devanagari font infused with various elements inspired by Indian art and architecture.

“Art and architecture have always flourished in India. This has been proved time and again by the breathtaking craftsmanship skills showcased in the ethereal beauty of sculptures that have unmistakably defined the various monuments and temples of the country. While the native Indian sculptures that have immortalized much of the country’s rich history in the temples and ancient cities, a constant influence of foreign art and culture has also enriched Indian sculpture and architecture.

Thus, Devanagari Monogram is an attempt to infuse old architectural and cultural styles prevalent in Indian history with regular Devanagari font. Till date no attempt has been made to stylize the Devanagari font. Hence, the result is a traditional Indian font in a refreshing way.”

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